GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set

GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set

GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set
GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR - 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS - Unique Set. A unique group of typescript draft materials copied from British diplomatic archives. Many rare and hard to find copies of internal diplomatic and cabinet correspondence by Russell, Gladstone, Bunch, Cowley, Lyons, and many others - the entire team responsible for British policy during the American Civil War. A full, first hand exposition of Britain's astonishment and horror at the American cataclysm, together with many efforts to maintain Transatlantic maritime & financial order, to relieve British merchants, and to restore cotton exports to international trade. Many named vessels and maritime negotiations. Organized, presented, and owned by Ephraim Douglass Adams (owner inscriptions in every volume).

Later accessioned by The William Forbes Library (stamps half-title verso, every volume) and then Occidental University Library (library perforation, every title page) and then released (stamps). Dewey decimal call numbers on every volume.

Held in Occidental Library's special collection department for many years and accessed very infrequently, probably due to its bare bones editorial content. We've searched for other copies of this set. Aside from similar research materials in the Ephraim Douglass Adams papers at Stanford University where the creator of the 15 volumes taught American history for many years, there are no other sets of its kind in any institution. We speculate that the set is unique, created for a specific purpose (see below). 2502 leaves in 15 volumes, 28cm, black buckram with gilt spine titles by Stanford Press Bindery (book tickets in some volumes).

All leaves typing bond, double-spaced courier font, rectos only. All pages typed originals, not carbons. Limited if any title pages. No indexes and no editorial information: just source material. Letters generally 2 to 5 pages (leaves), with occasional brief dispatches two to a page. The Gladstone volume [1] has the longest items, including one of 53 pages, and several over 10 pages. Each letter meticulously captioned with date, sender, location, recipient, and whether it is Private, Draft, or other bureaucratic distinction. The source is also noted, eg F. Or file if from private archives.

Almost all are in English, but occasionally a French language letter. Bindings handled and rubbed, but not seriously worn as the bindery is durable and recent.

Very occasion crease, and a couple of ink spots. The total volume of British Foreign Office correspondence regarding America between 1860 and 1865 well beyond what is offered here. The volumes represent a historian's selection and reflect the considerable discernment of both E.

Adams and Charles Francis Adams, Jr. Who were collaborating at the time the letters were selected and transcribed from handwritten originals. All letters bear on essential illuminating facts and moments of maximum intrigue.

A reader of history will find the volumes almost impossible to put down. The immediacy of the genre - that of diplomatic letters on typed sheets - gives the reader a thrilling experience of reliving the American Civil War from a unusual but well informed vantage point. Letters closely follow Ephraim Douglass Adam's diplomatic history. Great Britain and the American Civil War.

We've had a close look in the E. Adams book, and it's obvious that the selection of letters contained in the present volumes matches his footnotes and discussions inside the text. As a companion to the Adams book, the set is a priceless addendum. Why were these volumes produced [probably around 1924]? Perfect typing, chronological order, special binding?

Why aren't the transcriptions stuffed into a file box in the E. Adams archives at the Stanford University Library along with his other substantial notes and files? How did it get separated? In his introduction to Great Britain and the American Civil War, E. Adams explains in some detail: 1 his challenges accessing these letters in British Public Records Office and elsewhere prior to 1914 (where material after 1859 was embargoed from historian access); 2 delays caused by the Great War, and finally, 3 the tragic confusion associated with the death of his writing partner, Charles Francis Adams, Jr.

Adams collaborated on two volumes of the biography of C F Adams, Senior, the United States American Ambassador in London during the American Civil War. A critical third volume of the biography, a book about the 1860 to 1865 period, was delayed by war, and ultimately cancelled by CF Adams Jr's death in 1915.

Those supporting the collaboration, in particular Worthington C. Ford of the Massachusetts Historical Society, wanted E D Adams to carry on the project and finish the Adams biography.

The controversy generated at least one box of correspondence in the Stanford University Archives (unexamined). After CF Adams Jr's death, ED Adams embarked on his own work, changing the terms of his archival access agreements with a variety of influential English sources, against the expressed will of Worthington Ford. The circumstances apparently created a need for E. Adams, then a professor at Stanford University, to clearly distinguish "what he got" from the archives in order that all parties involved could agree on their use and release for publication. Thus, the present volumes - neat, complete, well captioned, but with bare bones editorial content. According to the introduction to. Intervention and assistance by Herbert Hoover was required to complete the E D Adams book. Formal publication approval of all the archival sources by the British Foreign Office completed the task. Therefore, the present volumes, I would presume, were created so that the Foreign Secretary, Lord Curzon, could read the actual letters (as you can still do today), and pass approval on them. Also, journalists interested in the Worthington controversy could see the raw feed from the secret British archives could satisfy their readers curiosity. Thus we have the basic letters, no opinions or even titles, and in sleek comfortable volumes. European involvement in the American Civil War wasn't merely an academic notion to people with living in the early 20th century, many of whom actively participated in the Civil War or lived with stories from the prior generation. The Confederacy considered the South's rebellion as a new American Revolutionary War - a war that ended, of course, with crucial military assistance from France.

Therefore, to repeat or to repel European aid were the singular goals of all American diplomats in London - and a central subject in the letters. The sensitive, candid conversations detailed in the letters were HIGHLY CLASSIFIED for many years - well into the 20th century. [Even here, some portions of a few letters are censored] It is presumed that only the prestige of Charles Francis Adams, Junior would convince family archivists and the Public Records Office to open access early for a distinguished writing team. Whats here represents the results of that effort. TRANSCRIPTS from the GLADSTONE PAPERS AT HAWARDEN - Including the Cabinet Memoranda of October and November, 1862, from the Palmerston Papers.

Lengthy cabinet opinions on the American situation. Recognition of the Independence of Southern States.. By Sir George Cornewall Lewis with Gladstone's marks replicated by transcribers. A rare pamphlet OCLC 32622745, two copies at Harvard and Chicago. Not at Stanford or Huntington.

Printed for use of the cabinet, an historical and strategic analysis of what had become after 15 months of cataclysmic war Prime Minister Gladstone's most urgent decision. Shall the Southern Confederacy be recognized? Lyons to Russell and Consuls 1860-64. Letters from Lord Lyons 109ff.

Russell and Consuls to Lyons 1860-64. Letters from Charleston, New Orleans, and Boston.

Many concern impressions of the Confederacy. Transcribed and collected from British Public Records Office Archives of the Foreign Office. Some items in French, some extracted.

America to and from Cowley by Russell and others. America, Folio 780, 781, 843, 844. America, single letters and extracts from Folios 790, 770, 789, 785, 849, 846, 932, 1009.

Mostly Russell to Lyons, but some Russell to Palmerston and replies from MSS. Mostly 2 to 3 pages with news and reflections, timed to regular New York packets. Russell Papers Lyons-Stuart 1863 160ff. Paris dispatches reactions to US Civil War. The item "GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p.

DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set" is in sale since Saturday, July 15, 2017. This item is in the category "Books\Antiquarian & Collectible". The seller is "poetryinpower" and is located in San Marino, California.

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GREAT BRITAIN & AMERICAN CIVIL WAR 15V 2702p. DIPLOMATIC LETTERS Unique Set