CIVIL WAR LADDER BADGE 108th COLORED INFANTRY UNION RARE USCI AFRICAN AMERICAN

CIVIL WAR LADDER BADGE 108th COLORED INFANTRY UNION RARE USCI AFRICAN AMERICAN
CIVIL WAR LADDER BADGE 108th COLORED INFANTRY UNION RARE USCI AFRICAN AMERICAN
CIVIL WAR LADDER BADGE 108th COLORED INFANTRY UNION RARE USCI AFRICAN AMERICAN
CIVIL WAR LADDER BADGE 108th COLORED INFANTRY UNION RARE USCI AFRICAN AMERICAN
CIVIL WAR LADDER BADGE 108th COLORED INFANTRY UNION RARE USCI AFRICAN AMERICAN
CIVIL WAR LADDER BADGE 108th COLORED INFANTRY UNION RARE USCI AFRICAN AMERICAN
CIVIL WAR LADDER BADGE 108th COLORED INFANTRY UNION RARE USCI AFRICAN AMERICAN

CIVIL WAR LADDER BADGE 108th COLORED INFANTRY UNION RARE USCI AFRICAN AMERICAN

CIVIL WAR LADDER BADGE 108th COLORED INFANTRY UNION RARE USCI AFRICAN AMERICAN. THEY ARE COLLECTIBLES AND WILL SHOW WEAR. THE PICTURES ARE PART OF THE DESCRIPTION. THANKS FOR LOOKING AT MY ITEMS.

ANTIQUE CIVIL WAR VETERAN LADDER BADGE. RARE BADGE FOR ONE JOHN HAMILTON, CO. AN AFRICAN AMERICAN SOLDIER HAVING SERVED THE UNION DURING THE WAR. OVERALL NICE CONDITION FOR AGE.

ABOUT 2.25 INCHES LONG OVERALL. SHOWING MINOR SURFACE AND LETTER FINISH WEAR. LOOKS LIKE A MAKERS MARK OF SOME KIND BOTTOM EDGE OF CROSSBAR, WORN. 108th Regiment, United States Colored Infantry.

Attached to 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, District of Kentucky, 5th Division, 23rd Corps, Dept. Of the Ohio, to January, 1865.

Military District of Kentucky to May, 1865. Of Mississippi and the Gulf to March, 1866. Garrison and guard duty at various points in Kentucky till January, 1865. Guard duty at Rock Island, Ill.

Of Mississippi till March, 1866. Mustered out March 21, 1866. Colored Infantry was a regiment of black men sent from Kentucky to guard Confederate prisoners at the Rock Island Arsenal.

The prison ran from December of 1863 through July 1865. Most were slaves from Kentucky, but there were some free men in the regiment.

Four of these men were from Illinois. Twenty-eight of the men were drafted into service. Lieutenant Colonel John Bishop, a white man, was the commander of the 108th. Unlike most officers at the time, he requested to command the unit, knowing that the recruits were black. From the start, Colonel Bishop was protective of his men.

Though they were supposed to be ready for the field by July 11, 1864, they did not report to the Rock Island Prison Barracks until September 24, 1864. This may be due to the horrible condition of their weapons. Colonel Bishop told the War Department that the unit had received badly damaged muskets that had been bent and straightened, and were not ready to report for duty with weapons that were only suited for drills.

His protests may have been the reason for the late arrival of the troops, but he knew they would be disadvantaged without proper guns. As one might imagine, black troops guarding white prisoners was not a popular idea. One prisoner, Lafayette Rogan, kept a diary of his time at the Rock Island Prison Barracks.

Rogan stated that the prisoners would have to submit to this indignity of being guarded by a regiment of contrabands. He later wrote, Eight thousand Southern men today are guarded by their slaves who have been armed by the Tyrant. It was not long before the 108th became known for firing on prisoners. This could have been due to their inexperience with gunsreportedly, many of the black guards shot themselves on accident. Of course, some of the shootings were likely brought about by the provocation of the prisoners, who taunted the black guards.

During their stay in Rock Island, Colonel Bishop often asked for better treatment of the men from Colonel Adolphus Johnson, the Commanding Officer of the Prison Barracks. The black troops were routinely asked to perform tasks without the same resources as their white counterparts, and were not treated fairly. But when it was time for the black soldiers to do this job, they had to fill larger pools with less men, and were not given horses to assist them. Also, even though all troops were supposed to share fatigue duty, Colonel Bishop complained that his men performed this duty more often. This sort of mistreatment may have led to the extremely high death rate of the 108th.

Fifty-two men died from diseases while at Rock Island, and the high numbers of dead troops unfortunately continued even after their transfer to Massachusetts at the end of the Civil War. Bishop was strict with his men, but he had good reason. There were local Southern sympathizers who might have targeted the troops. He also had trouble with the men visiting Davenport.

Their time there was restricted, but they often broke the rules and were court marshaled. He was likely trying to stop the soldiers from the evils of gambling and drinking. Even when they finally were allowed to travel to Davenport, they were forbidden from staying past 6:30 p.

Though conditions were not good, the troops must have kept their mind on the benefits of serving. When signing up for their three-year enlistment, they received the same privileges and pay as other Federal soldiers. Any man who enlisted after June 15, 1864 was no longer restricted in benefits and pay as persons of African descent had once been.

An even bigger benefit was realized on March 3, 1865. Congress freed the black soldiers, as well as their wives and children, who had enlisted in the Army in Kentucky. Colonel Bishop had again expressed his support for the men, writing letters to the Military Governor of Kentucky to try to free their families. More than just a pretty picture. FREE scheduling, supersized images and templates.

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CIVIL WAR LADDER BADGE 108th COLORED INFANTRY UNION RARE USCI AFRICAN AMERICAN