1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG

1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG
1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG
1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG
1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG
1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG
1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG
1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG
1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG
1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG
1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG
1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG
1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG

1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG

Ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG. Hugh Judson Kilpatrick (1836 1881) was an officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War, achieving the rank of brevet major general. This work is a collection of sketches of the life of General Kilpatrick and various accounts of engagements under his command during the Civil War. Kilpatrick and our cavalry : comprising a sketch of the life of General Kilpatrick, with an account of the cavalry raids, engagements, and operations under his command, from the beginning of the rebellion to the surrender of Johnston. Subtitle: Comprising a Sketch of the Life of General Kilpatrick, with an account of the Cavalry Raids, Engagements, and Operations under his Command, from the Beginning of the Rebellion to the Surrender of Johnston.

Brown cloth cover is ruled and stamped in a ribbed pattern with a cavalry soldier and his horse in center, front and back. Wear as seen in photos.

Complete with all 245 pages; plus indexes, prefaces, and such. 7.5in X 5in (19cm x 13cm). Hugh Judson Kilpatrick (January 14, 1836 December 4, 1881) was an officer in the Union Army during the American Civil War, achieving the rank of brevet major general. He was later the United States Minister to Chile, and a failed political candidate for the U. Known as "Kilcavalry" (or "Kill-Cavalry") for using tactics in battle that were considered as a reckless disregard for lives of soldiers under his command, Kilpatrick was both praised for the victories he achieved, and despised by southerners whose homes and towns he devastated.

2.2 The Dahlgren Affair. 2.3 Final campaigns through Georgia and the Carolinas. Hugh Judson Kilpatrick, more commonly referred to as Judson Kilpatrick, the fourth child of Colonel Simon Kilpatrick and Julia Wickham, was born on the family farm in Wantage Township, near Deckertown, New Jersey (now Sussex Borough). Kilpatrick graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1861, just after the start of the war, and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the 1st U.

Within three days he was a captain in the 5th New York Infantry ("DuryƩe's Zouaves"). Kilpatrick was the first United States Army officer to be wounded in the Civil War, struck in the thigh by canister fire while leading a company at the Battle of Big Bethel, June 10, 1861. By September 25 he was a lieutenant colonel, now in the 2nd New York Cavalry, which he helped to raise, and it was the mounted arm that brought him fame and infamy.

Assignments were initially quiet for Lt. Kilpatrick, serving in staff jobs and in minor cavalry skirmishes. That changed in the Second Battle of Bull Run in August 1862.

He raided the Virginia Central Railroad early in the campaign and then ordered a foolish twilight cavalry charge the first evening of the battle, losing a full squadron of troopers. Nevertheless, he was promoted to full colonel on December 6. Kilpatrick was aggressive, fearless, ambitious, and blustery. He was a master, in his mid-twenties, of using political influence to get ahead. His men had little love for his manner and his willingness to exhaust men and horses and to order suicidal mounted cavalry charges.

The rifled muskets introduced to warfare in the 1850s made the historic cavalry charge essentially an anachronism. Cavalry's role shrank primarily to screening, raiding, and reconnaissance. The widespread nickname they used for Kilpatrick was "Kill Cavalry". He also had a bad reputation with others in the Army. His camps were poorly maintained and frequented by prostitutes, often visiting Kilpatrick himself.

He was jailed again for a drunken spree in Washington, D. And for allegedly accepting bribes in the procurement of horses for his command. Harper's Weekly rendering of Kilpatrick's raid. Joseph Hooker created a Cavalry Corps in the Army of the Potomac, commanded by Maj. Kilpatrick assumed command of the 1st Brigade, 2nd Division. In the Chancellorsville Campaign in May, Stoneman's cavalry was ordered to swing deeply behind Gen.

Lee's army and destroy railroads and supplies. Kilpatrick did just that, with gusto. Although the corps failed to distract Lee as intended, Kilpatrick achieved fame by aggressively capturing wagons, burning bridges, and riding around Lee, almost to the outskirts of Richmond, Virginia, in Stoneman's 1863 Raid. Union Cavalry General Hugh Judson Kilpatrick.

At the beginning of the Gettysburg Campaign, on June 9, 1863, Kilpatrick fought at Brandy Station, the largest cavalry battle of the war. He received his brigadier general's star on June 13, fought at Aldie and Upperville, and assumed division command three days before the Battle of Gettysburg commenced. On June 30, he clashed briefly with J. Stuart's cavalry at Hanover, Pennsylvania, but then proceeded on a wild goose chase in pursuit of Stuart, rather than fulfilling his mission of intelligence gathering.

On the second day of the Gettysburg battle, July 2, 1863, Kilpatrick's division skirmished against Wade Hampton five miles northeast of town at Hunterstown. He then settled in for the night to the southeast at Two Taverns. One of his famous brigade commanders, Brig. Custer, was ordered to join Brig. Gregg's division for the next day's action against Stuart's cavalry east of town, so Kilpatrick was down to one brigade.

On July 3, after Pickett's Charge, he was ordered by army commander Maj. Meade and Cavalry Corps commander Alfred Pleasonton to launch a cavalry charge against the infantry positions of Lt. James Longstreet's Corps on the Confederate right flank, just west of Little Round Top.

Kilpatrick's lone brigade commander, Brig. Farnsworth, protested against the futility of such a move.

Kilpatrick essentially questioned his bravery and allegedly dared him to charge: Then, by God, if you are afraid to go I will lead the charge myself. Farnsworth reluctantly complied with the order. He was killed in the attack and his brigade suffered significant losses. Kilpatrick and the rest of the cavalry pursued and harassed Lee during his retreat back to Virginia.

That fall, he took part in an expedition to destroy the Confederate gunboats Satellite and Reliance in the Rappahannock River, boarding them and capturing their crews successfully. The item "1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG" is in sale since Wednesday, November 01, 2017. This item is in the category "Books\Antiquarian & Collectible". The seller is "schilb_antique_books" and is located in Columbia, Missouri. This item can be shipped worldwide.


1865 1st ed Life of General Kilpatrick American CIVIL WAR Cavalry GETTYSBURG