1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy

1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy
1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy
1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy
1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy
1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy
1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy
1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy
1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy
1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy
1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy
1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy
1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy

1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy

Ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy. The opinions expressed by Cairnes as to the probable issue of American Civil War were largely verified by the actual course of events, and the appearance of the book had a marked influence on the attitude taken by serious political thinkers in England towards the Confederate States of America.

While slavery in itself was highly detested by half of the United States in the early 19. Century, many Americans, both slave and free, perceived that a small group of wealthy slave owners had significant political power, which helped them control portions of the government. This Slave Power movement was dismissed by many southerners as being true, and Civil War destroyed all that was left of Slave Power, as abolitionists helped erase the influence of wealthy slave owners.

This first edition of J. Cairnes work on Slave Power, offered the public the opportunity to gain an understanding of the corruption in wealthy slave owners, albeit a conspiracy or not. The slave power : its character, career, et probable designs: being an attempt to explain the real issues involved in the American contest. London : Parker, Son & Co. Collation complete with all pages: xviii, 304p, [8].

9in X 6in (23cm x 15cm). Slave Power was pejorative - but deserved, and accurate - term used by opponents of slavery in the U. To identify the corrupting influence that slavery had on the United States of America. The Republican Party made it a main theme of the 1850s, arguing that the slave owners had seized control of most of the national government and were using it to their own ends. The Republicans argued this violated Republicanismthat is, it violated basic American political values.

The American Civil War destroyed the "slave power" and the Republican policies during Reconstruction were specifically designed to totally erase its influence. 8 Impact of Democratic Free Soilers.

The argument was that this small group of rich men had seized control of their own states and was trying to take over the national government in illegitimate fashion to use it to expand and protect slavery. The issue was not the treatment of slaves. It was fear of slave oligarchs. Men and women could differ on scores of issues, hate blacks or like them, denounce slavery as a sin or promise to guarantee its protection in the Deep South, and still attack the Slaveocracy. It mattered not where one stood on the other issues. One could still hate the slavemasters with a passion. The term was popularized by antislavery intellectuals such as John Gorham Palfrey, Josiah Quincy, Horace Bushnell, James Shepherd Pike, Horace Greeley and Henry Wilson. They showed through a combination of emotive argument and hard statistical data that the South had long held a disproportionate level of power within the nation. Did the slave power really exist?

Millions in the North thought so, and acted upon it. However the notion was ridiculed by Southerners at the time, and rejected as false by historians of the 1920s and 1930s, who stressed that the South was internally divided before 1850. [2] The idea that the Slave Power existed has partly come back at the hands of neoabolitionist historians since 1970, and few historians now disagree that it was a powerful factor in the beliefs of Northerners. Slave Power derived from a combination of factors. The "three-fifths clause, " (counting 100 slaves as 60 people for seats in the House and thus for electoral votes) gave the South additional representation at the national level.

[3] Parity in the Senate was critical, whereby a new slave state was admitted in tandem with a new free state. Regional unity across party lines was essential on key votes. In the Democratic party, the a presidential candidate had to carry the national convention by a two-thirds vote to get nominated. [5] However, the North was adding populationand House seatsmuch faster than the South, so the handwriting was on the wall. With the implacable Republicans gaining every year, the secession option became more and more attractive to the South.

Secession was suicidal, as some leaders realizedand as John Quincy Adams had long prophesied. Secession, argued James Henry Hammond of South Carolina, reminded him of the Japanese who when insulted rip open their own bowels. And yet when secession came in 1860 Hammond followed. Richards concludes, It was men like Hammond who finally destroyed the Slave Power.

Thanks to their leading the South out of the Union, seventy-two years of slaveholder domination came to an end. The item "1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy" is in sale since Sunday, March 26, 2017. This item is in the category "Books\Antiquarian & Collectible". The seller is "schilb_antique_books" and is located in Columbia, Missouri.

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1862 1st ed Slave Power Cairnes American CIVIL WAR Slavery Abolition Conspiracy